KS&R Report: Podcasts Are Replacing Traditional Media Consumption

KS&R, an industry-leading strategic consultancy and marketing research firm, announced the release of its research report, “Podcast Frenzy: Riding the Wive of Ever-Increasing Popularity”.

This report found that podcasts are replacing traditional media consumption across all generations. Additionally, a significant portion of Gen Z (more than a quarter) and Millennials (more than a third) listen to podcasts on a daily basis. In fact, since they began listening to podcasts, listeners reported that 28% of them watch less TV, and 24% browse social media less often. Even one-third of Gen Z listeners said they now spend less time playing video games.

There are generational gaps in the types of podcasts to which aficionados listen, however:

Gen Z prefers comedy (47%) followed by pop culture (34%)

Millennials also prefer comedy (45%) followed by true crime (35%)

Gen X prefers news (33%) followed by comedy (32%)

Baby Boomers also prefer news (37%) followed by politics (36%)

Video podcasting is popular, particularly via Youtube (45%) which is especially popular among men. Looking ahead, K&R expects augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR) and other interactive features to become increasingly common, elevating podcasting experience with more interactive and immersive content

“In this podcasting landscape, we’re witnessing a profound shift, particularly in the loyalty and influence of ‘super listeners,’” said Jennifer Longo, KS&R Telecom, Entertainment and Content Specialist. “It’s an exciting time for podcasting, with boundless possibilities on the horizon.”

Findings are from KS&R’s Entercom & Recreation Landscape Survey. 5,000 online surveys were completed March-April 2023, among consumers ages 13-76, contacted through a nationwide online panel, representative of the US Census population.

Read the full report here.

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